Old Sayings (that nobody says anymore)

I started thinking about this the other day and decided to start writing down sayings from my youth. How many do you remember? Do you have any to add? Please do so in the comments and I will share!  PART ONE:

  • You sound like a broken record
  • If you had a brain, you’d take it out and play with it.
  • That’s the way the cookie crumbles
  • Never look a gift horse in the mouth
  • No sense crying over spilt milk
  • Beggers can’t be choosers
  • Penny saved is a penny earned
  • That’s water under the bridge
  • Bright eyed and bushy tailed
  • It takes two to tango
  • A few beers short of a six-pack
  • Slicker than silk (alternative “snot”)
  • Chew the fat
  • Deader than a doornail
  • Happy as a lark
  • Happy as a pig in slop
  • Going on a bender
  • I’m feeling right as rain
  • God willing and the creek don’t rise
  • A day late and a dollar short
  • Mean as a junkyard dog
  • Don’t let the door hit you on the way out
  • Here’s your hat, what’s your hurry
  • Colder than a bare butt on a brass bedpan
  • No guts, no glory
  • Like trying to find a needle in a haystack
  • May hay while the sun shines
  • Preaching to the choir
  • What’s good for the goose is good for the gander
  • Run like the devil is after you
  • Somewhere between the devil and the deep blue sea

I’ll be back for part two in the blink of an eye…

The Entertainer Blogger Award

The Entertainer Blogger Award

 

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Thanks so much to Ana Rocha from https://cookthebeans.com for nominating me for this award. Please visit her blog If you want to know more about travel, food, vegan cooking & eating, and recipes from all over the planet. Very educational and entertaining.

Why did you start blogging in the first place? 

I have always been a writer. Professionally for many years as a journalist and in public relations, but also writing fiction on the side, short stories and eventually two novels (working on the third). I also love to travel and take photos. One of my blog series is call 50 states/50 countries and it gives me a chance to share photos from around the globe.

What is your favorite book?

Love to read. Got my first library card in the 4th grade. Beyond the Hardy Boys, one “adult” book got me hooked and remains a favorite…A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain

What do you dislike the most?

People arguing politics on Facebook.

What is your favourite food at the mall?

Has to be sushi.

What is your favorite pastime?

Three main areas would be: writing/photography; playing bass guitar & singing with my 60’s cover band, Revolution Road; acting on stage, TV and film.

MY NOMINEES

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Congrats to all nominees 💚 Can’t wait to read your replies.

📍Rules

  • Thank the person who nominated you add link to their blog
  • Add the rules, so others can follow
  • Nominate people who you find fun, inspiring and entertaining!
  • Answer the same questions
  • Include the graphic in your post

50 States/50 Countries – Windsor Castle

PICT0731 (2)Everyone is getting excited about the upcoming Royal Wedding (week from Saturday) and the site of the wedding in Windsor Castle, so I thought I’d share a few photos of my visit there during Queen Elizabeth’s 25th Anniversary celebrations…

PICT0713 (2)Notice the date on the banner 1977!

PICT0714 (2)Queen Elizabeth the First (The Virgin Queen)

PICT0720 (2)A busy weekend at Windsor…

PICT0718 (2)Four Musketeers?

PICT0728 (2)When this flag is flying the Queen is in residence…

PICT0716 (3)MAKE WAY!

PICT0717Most folks don’t realize Windsor Castle is huge! (William the Conqueror built it starting in 1017 in the town of Windsor, high above the Thames River, and completing construction 16 years later in 1033 AD).

PICT0726 (2)Inside the walls around the castle keep…

PICT0727 (2)Arrow slots to defend the castle…not today, but a good vantage point to see and hear the band…

PICT0723 (2)Statue of a heraldic symbol…

The marriage chapel is inside and off limits to the general public, so I might as well just cruise on down the Thames to London…

PICT0712 (2)Good Day, Guv’ & Happy Travels!  Rich

 

 

Religion in Cairo

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The Christian world celebrated Easter yesterday (originally a Pagan celebration of spring & fertility…hence the decorated eggs)…and our Jewish friends observed Passover, which as we all know happened in Egypt.

Although some sage warned me years ago never to discuss politics, religion, sex or to appear in a movie scene with kids or animals, I am going to plow ahead.

I had the unique experience in one day some thirty-four years ago in Cairo, Egypt to visit three historic and significant sites for three of the planet’s major religions — Christian, Judaism, and Muslim.

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We had a guide who did an excellent job describing the sites in detail as well as the religions the sites represented.

What struck me was the similarities among all three religion with the central theme being a belief in one God and a set of morale values…a guide to show us how we should lead our lives and  treat each other.

Abu Serga church is considered one of the oldest churches in Cairo. This church was built during the 5th century, burned during the fire of Fustat during the reign of Marwan II around 750, then restored during the 8th century, and has been rebuilt and restored since medieval times. PICT0142 (2)

The church is believed to have been constructed where the holy family rested at the end of their journey into Egypt.

On the first day of June, the Coptic Church commemorates the Holy Family’s flight into Egypt by holding a mass on that day in this ancient church.

The Ben Ezra Synagogue (Hebrewבית כנסת בן עזרא‎,) is situated in Old Cairo. According to local folklore, it is built on the site where the pharaoh’s daughter found Moses hidden in the reeds of the Nile.

Ben-Ezra-Synagogue

PICT0145 (3)The founding date of the Ben Ezra Synagogue is not known, although there is good evidence from documents found in the geniza or store room that it predates 882 C.E. and is probably pre-Islamic.

A young couple from Israel approached us while we were there and asked if we would take their photo in front of the Torah. We did.

This was the synagogue whose geniza was found in the 19th century to contain a treasure of abandoned Hebrew, Aramaic and Judeo-Arabic secular and sacred manuscripts. The priceless collection was originally brought to Cambridge, England but is now divided between several academic libraries.

This temple today is only used as a tourist site. Egypt’s Jewish community is at the end of a dramatic decline, going from about 80,000 people in the 1920s to less than a dozen of Egyptian ancestry left today (descendants of the slaves that built the pyramids).

PICT0017 (3)Built from 1830 to 1848 by the commission of Muhammad Ali Pasha, the Muhammad Ali Mosque is the largest Ottoman mosque to be built in the early 19th century. The mosque is in the Citadel of Cairo, Egypt. With its twin minarets, animated silhouette and recognizable design, it is the most visible mosque in Cairo.PICT0156 (2)

The Mohammad Ali Mosque, designed by Greek architect Jacob Bushnaq of Istanbul, is eminently Turkish in style, echoing its Ottoman origins. The use of slim minarets, cascading domes, spacious interiors, large chandeliers, walls decorated with Thuluth inscriptions and beautiful hanging globe lamps are all reflecting the best mosques found in Istanbul. PICT0160 (2)

Set on the foot of the Mugattam Hills, the mosque dominates the whole Citadel, and it is the most visible monument on the Cairo skyline.

PICT0165 (2)On the inside, the rooms reflect some French Rococo as well as Art Nouveau influences, with heavily ornamentation of lines of green, red and gold. All in all, the mosque is as colorful as a Fabergé egg, and the exteriors are just exceptional. Interestingly, the mosque is made of some unusual choice of materials: alabaster and metal. Beautiful!

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What a speed dating type interaction with culture and religion…but one I will never forget…to walk the same alleyway as Mary carrying the Baby Jesus…PICT0136 (2)

To stand in a temple where Moses was found as a baby…

All set in ancient Egypt, land of pyramids & the Pharaohs…almost too much to comprehend.

Peace & Love & Happy Traveling.

Writing a Novel

quill (2)You have to be crazy to write a novel…and I’ve done it twice, so I should know. So why did I decide to start a new series of mystery books after fifteen frustrating years with the first two — writing, proofing, re-writing, proofing, looking for an agent/publisher, proofing, giving up on finding an agent/publisher, and agonizing over the need for never ending promotion? (Assuming you want somebody to read what you wrote).

The flip answer might be I write because I’m lousy at tap dancing, but the real answer is I like to tell stories.

I’ve been making up scenes and characters for as long as I remember, as well as reading books since I got my first library card at eight years old. I like to make people laugh too, so no matter how serious the story, you will find a lot of humor sprinkled into the action.

Example from Identity Check:  “Okay,” she said, “It’s your turn. Strip for me.”

“I don’t think so.”

“Don’t tell me you’re shy. I could put on some music and whistle loudly.”

“To be fair, I never got to see your act,” he said, throwing the clothes in his arms onto a nearby chair, “just the remnants.”

“All right, I’ll let you look, but only a peek. Normal men have been known to lose their sight at such a vision.”

“Have you been flashing down at the blind school again? That’s just mean-spirited.”

“For that cruel comment, you’ve forfeited your shot at a piece of heaven.”

“Okay, I’m taking off my clothes, but, I don’t want to hear any crude remarks from you.”

“Me? Never. Whoa–somebody let the stallion out of the barn.”

“That’s it. I’m turning off the lights.”

My new fictional YA series features a private investigator, nicknamed “Tracker,” that uses his Native American skills to solve mysteries (aided by his teenage nephew). I’m about 25,000 words into the first book about a murder that happens in Crater Lake National Park…and the suspected killer is Sasquatch!

People ask me, “How do you get your story ideas?” My first novel, “Drafted,” drew heavily on my personal experience of being drafted into the US Army during Vietnam…an adventure filled with terror and humor.

I can’t wait to see how it all gets resolved. I don’t do an outline when I write, although I have a vague idea of the direction the story is headed. My technique is to create characters, put them into a situation, and see how they handle it. I’m also big on action and stingy on description. I hate writers that spend three pages describing the wallpaper (unless it is smeared with blood).

Well, back to the computer…another 75,000 words to go…maybe I’ll write a few pages describing the wallpaper.

2018

I suddenly realized I haven’t posted anything in 2018 and it’s already Groundhog Day in February.

I have never been consistent about posting things, although I am retired and have the time to do a daily post, I lack discipline and can be easily distracted…there is TV, 17854914_10154481697807361_2240554759244671082_owalking the dog, eating, drinking, sleeping, reading, going to the bathroom, getting angry at stupid political posts Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, movies, playing in my band Revolution road, acting or going on auditions, writing songs, working on my new novel…did I mention eating?IMG_6063 (2)

 

(That’s me dancing in the movie “Battle of the Sexes” next to Sarah Silverman)

I mostly blame my recent Blog neglect on 2017 because the end of any year is always downhill.

First there is Halloween…buying the candy, putting up the outdoor decorations, choosing the right costume, watching all those fog machine (2)scary/fun movie classic like “Beatlejuice, Hocus Pocus, Practical Magic, Halloween, Nightmare on Elm Street,” and handing out candy to tiny trick or treaters.

Right after that comes Thanksgiving…buying the turkey, preparing & sharing the feast for family and guests, and of course, watching the Macy’s Parade and the movie “Miracle on 34th Street.”

 

christmas cover (2)The day after…craziness arrives as the shopping begins for Christmas gifts, writing that Christmas letter, putting up the holiday lights and decorating the Christmas tree, preparing/sharing the Christmas dinner… (https://open.spotify.com/album/0a4ISx3Hbw7wuMltxk3FIl#_=_)

Six days later at midnight, we are kissing strangers, blowing off fireworks, singing “Auld Lang Syne” and another year is gone. Or in my case, performing with my band Revolution Road. https://youtu.be/fH1qtea5dJ4)26112152_10155191105392361_8077206774660448987_n (2)

 

Anyhow, my 2018 resolution is to be more regular about my Blog posts…just as soon as I get something to eat and have a nice little nap…

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving Thanks From Around the World…

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benjamin-franklinWell, it’s #Thanksgiving in America, where both the turkey and the people around the table get stuffed. We aren’t the only country to celebrate this Holiday. It’s also observed in Canada, a few Caribbean islands, and Liberia (Where the heck is Liberia and how did they get in on the action?). Canada gets the jump on us by celebrating in October. That’s why starting November 1, you see so many turkeys migrating north. Still, we manage to capture and eat 46 million of the birds in one day! Not bad for a fowl once proposed by Benjamin Franklin as the “national bird.” If he had been successful we might be eating eagles on this day…NOT!

The holiday originated with the Pilgrims, I’m told, who were giving thanks for making it safely across the ocean to the new world and not starving to death…mainly because the Indians (now called Native Americans by everyone except the tribes themselves) welcomed them and shared their food. We repaid them by taking over their county…bet they regret that original instinct to help.

Thanksgiving in the USA is also associated with hours of American asleep TVfootball on the telly while the family sits around facing the screen…sound asleep. Oddly enough football is played with a pigskin…I wonder if they ever thought of substituting a turkey skin or having Americans eat BBQ pulled pork on this day.

 

As we all give thanks today for the positive things in our life, I wanted to share with you an amazing stack of letters I discovered where folks around the world shared what they are thankful for on this day, November 23, 2017. Here are some of my favorites:

  • Washington DC Interns wrote they are thankful Bill is not back in the White House.
  • The Pope wrote he was grateful they finally made the communion wafers sugar free.
  • Putin wrote he was happy his official Kremlin portrait showed him shirtless.
  • Kim Jong-il is happy Amazon finally shipped him the four-inch shoe lifts he order on Prime.
  • The media is thrilled they are no longer required to confirm sources or stories or report both sides of an issue and can say whatever they damn well please without repercussion.
  • Roy Moore is thankful for his favorite song, “Thank Heavens for Little Girls.”
  • Los Angeles is grateful for all the parade permit money they get from protest marches.
  • Anthony Wiener is grateful for the Internet.
  • Hollywood is not pleased to be named the sexual harassment capitol of the world but in an effort to recognize the problem plan to put clothes on the Oscar, Golden Globes and SAG awards statues.
  • Congress is grateful to still have a job despite not showing up for work in more than ten years.
  • Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is very pleased with the millions of rubles he received from overseas advertising during the 2016 election campaign.
  • Charlie Rose is thankful for see thru shower sliding doors.

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Richard Allan Jones is an author, actor and musician living in Los Angeles…

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